Made In China Movie Review

Made In China Movie Review : Rajkumar Rao, Paresh Rawal & Mouni Roy

Star Cast: Rajkummar Rao, Boman Irani, Mouni Roy, Sumeet Vyas, Gajraj Rao, Sanjay Goradia, Paresh Rawal &  Director: Mikhil Musale

Story:

Set in Gujarat, the story is about an underdog Raghuveer Mehta (Rajkummar Rao), who has tried various abstract business ideas and failed in every one of them. He listens to the inspirational financial speeches from Abhay Chopra (Gajraj Rao) and belongs to a rich family. Cousin Devraj (Sumeet Vyas) is a business icon & father Vithhal (Manoj Joshi) undermines his talent.

With some motivation from his wife Rukmani (Mouni Roy), Raghu leaves for China with Devraj to crack a deal. On getting there, he feels ignored and unimportant. He bumps into the master businessman Tanmay Shah (Paresh Rawal), gets an idea on how to do business, returns to India and teams up with Dr. Vardhi (Boman Irani) to sell a sex-stimulating soup. The rest of the story is about how he faces some issues because of this business & how he overcomes them.

Made in China Movie Review: Script Analysis

This is one of those rare movies which I tried so much to like and ended up heartbroken. Niren Bhatt’s pens the story in a way that a moment you start liking the film, it starts to drag for no reason. There’s one brilliant sequence, masterfully written, at a parent meeting in a school & it’s followed by the most illogical scene. So, there’s a pattern that stays till the end allowing you never to like the film for a long time.

Is the genre comedy? Is the genre drama? Or is it both? It’s a convoluted mess and Karan Vyas’ dialogues are major to be blamed for it. This kind of film relies on good dialogues and there’s not a single one I’m taking back home. Anuj Rakesh Dhawan’s camera captures the congested China very well & blends it brilliantly with some similar shades of India.

Made in China Movie Review: Star Performance

We’ve seen a better Rajkummar Rao for way many times before this. He’s made for the character but unfortunately, the character isn’t made for him. However hard he tries, it’s just not enough because of how lazily his character has been sketched. There’s not a single scene that utilizes Raj to the optimum.

You know a film is not up to the mark when even someone like Boman Irani fails to create the desired impact. There are a few scenes to boast about, but that’s about it. The script of him lashing out in the climax scene is so poorly done, that instead of holding your attention it pisses you off. Mouni Roy is just a filler.

Paresh Rawal’s cameo is the best thing happened to this average film. He just lights up the screen whenever he enters a scene. Not kidding, his scene with Rajkummar Rao discussing business reminded me of the classic ‘McConaughey-Caprio’ sequence from The Wolf Of The Wall Street. Gajraj Rao & Sumeet Vyas are perfect in their roles, though I wished to see more of them. From the supporting cast, Sanjay Goradia shines bright & brings the house down with his comic timing.

Made in China Movie Review: Direction, Music

Mikhil Musale, the man behind the National Award winning film Wrong Side Raju, unfortunately, lands on the wrong side of Bollywood. He directs disjointed sequences that at a time make no sense. Full marks for retaining the Gujarati flavour but the flavour is of no use if you fail to get the ingredients right.

Sachin-Jigar compose 4 songs out of which 3 are recreated and that came in as no surprise. Sanedo, Odhani are just fillers and had no means to clutter the already slothful narrative. Valam is perfectly placed & tries to strengthen the chemistry of Rajkummar-Mouni which is of no use in the later stage of the film.

Made in China Movie Review: The Last Word

All said and done, Made In China is actually ‘Made In China’ & it justifies its title. It wanted to say something important (like many other films) but took the lazy route to do so (like many other films).

What’s Good: Despite having a voluminous cast like Rajkummar, Boman, Gajraj, Sumeet, it’s Paresh Rawal’s cameo that’s the biggest takeaway and in a way, it’s not a good sign for the film.

What’s Bad: Says something very important but in a way, you won’t want to hear.

Source: koimoi.com

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